Standardbred Showcase: Just Anna and Jessamyn Maumill

Standardbred Showcase

I’m proud to showcase Just Anna & Jassamyn Maumill for our third instalment of Standardbred Showcase #transformationtuesday, a new segment through Dressage Dreamers.

Just Anna & Jessamyn Maumill

Jessamyn from the Blue Mountains New South Wales found Just Anna back in 2016, Anna, at the time, an un raced three year old, going through countless sales throughout New South Wales. Who also spent time as an embryo mare in the Central West area. However, after she failed as a surrogate she was soon put up for re-homing. While Jess finding Anna’s Facebook ad during her HSC, they haven’t looked back since.

After a long 6-hour trip to go and see Anna, Jess fell in love. It wasn’t long until transport was organised, Anna arrived skinny and scared. Soon in Jess’ care Anna started to put the weight back on and feel safe in her new home.

Standardbred Showcase

Jess admits they have had an eventful road together, with Anna being broken into saddle at the end of 2016 with plenty of spells when needed to allow her to mature and be a horse.  It was almost a year into her new career when Jess started free jumping Anna. Who, after clearing a 1 meter fence! Quickly found out this is where her true talent lies, the pair haven’t looked back since.  But still train in hacking and dressage.

Standardbred Showcase

Anna and Jess have achieved so much together she finds it hard to put it all down!

Proudly together their achievements are:
  • Anna putting her trust in Jess, which was lead to her being started under saddle.
  • Anna learning to accept the bridle (as this was something that she found very hard to accept).
  • Becoming at ease in new situations, including being shod and being clipped for the first time.
  • Removing any trace of pacing for the most beautiful canter.
  • Establishing being ‘in frame’ and ‘on the bit’ regularly.
  • Their first jumps.
  • Continuing jumping new things and raising the heights.

 

Their major competition achievements are:
  • Competing at their first show in Oberon and completing in their first showjumping competition at various heights including 45 cm, 60 cm and 75 cm. Proudly shocked everyone by placing first in the 60 cm round!
  • Rylestone Show, having their first try at hacking, coming home with seconds and thirds, and also continuing in the showjumping arena competing in the 60 cm and 80 cm rounds, coming home with multiple seconds and thirds.
  • Sofala Show, continuing in their hacking experience and coming home with firsts, seconds and thirds from all of the classes. Not to mention Champion Led Standardbred and the opportunity to compete for Supreme Led Mare!

Standardbred Showcase

With these achievements under their belt, Jess has great aspirations with Anna for the future. In the next 12 months her aims are:
  • Jumping and competing at a higher level, Jump C grade in Pony Club (75cm-90cm). Always with the potential to go higher!
  • Competing in dressage and eventing. – Would love to participate in a One Day Event!
  • Compete at a few major shows, such as, Bathurst Royal.

But, what I love the most about Jess’ goals is wanting to bring awareness of Standardbred’s versatility and their heart. With Anna she has made all her achievements possible and has shaped her into a better rider she is today. Her biggest inspirations are all the influential people she follows on social media or out at competitions, who make the best out of what they have. The amount of amazing horse owners who achieve so much with so little but are always willing to help others are the kind of people who she aspires to.

StandardbredShowcase

If Jess could have a lesson with anyone, it would be Alycia Burton, she has the most amazing technique and her amazing story is one that she can honestly relate to in many ways. Alycia’s horsemanship is inspiring on so many levels, she too hopes one day to learn to destroy her fears like Alycia has.

No story is complete without special mentions from people who have inspired and helped us along our journey. Jess would love to thank her Grandmother and her Grandfather, Beryl and John Vickery and her Aunt Elizabeth. Because no matter what, even a State away, they have supported her through everything and have never let her give up. They have helped shape her into a better person and for that thank you will never be enough.

And of course, a special thanks to Anna! She was the first horse Jess has broken in herself and will always have her special place at home with her no matter what the future holds.

 

If you would like to have your standardbred featured #transformationtuesday please click here for the information and email info@dressagedreamers.com.au 

 

Standardbred Showcase

Most Common Myths Surrounding the Standardbred: Part 2

I enjoy writing and sharing my insights about what I am passionate about, anything Standardbred and dressage I can chat all day. It is important in our sport that we are a supportive bunch of individuals, this is why I find it incredibly frustrating reading and listening to people putting down and creating a negative environment surrounding the Standardbred.

I previously posted about how Standardbreds are trained to pace and trained not to canter in Part 1 of Common Myths Surrounding the Standardbred. I discussed my insights about how the Standardbred are naturally a 5-gaited breed. Thanks to the scientists at Sweden’s Uppsala University, who discovered the gene called DMRT3. In turn, allowing the Standardbred to have the natural ability to pace.

Standardbred Myths

Personally, I feel every myth surrounding the Standardbred stems from myth #1 Standardbreds are trained to pace and trained not to canter. This cloud of misconception hangs over almost every aspect with Standardbreds after racing.

Personally, I feel every myth surrounding the Standardbred stems from myth #1 Standardbreds are trained to pace and trained not to canter. This cloud of misconception hangs over almost every aspect with Standardbreds after racing.

I wanted to discuss what I personally feel is the second biggest myth surrounding the Standardbred.

Standardbreds will never make a competitive mount.

Discussion purposes, let’s just assume 95% of people who have this brain wave of ‘Standardbreds will never make a competitive mount’ believe this because the horse is a ‘Standardbred’ meaning they pace. Which, they believe they will always pace and nothing else. They only believe they will be good trail horses or anything in a ‘non-competitive’ event.

Then the remaining 5% are individuals who aren’t on any of our Christmas card list, they just dismiss anything or don’t even have a second thought about it.  Closed book, Standardbreds don’t exist.

Rather than laying the facts out explaining that the Standardbred is naturally a 5-gaited breed and they have the capability (like any other breed) to trot, canter and gallop. I thought to discuss how to successfully show the 95% can be a competitive mount, as they say a picture is worth 1,000 words.

Because, guaranteed to any Standardbred owner you know your horse has what it takes to hold themselves in any show line up, in any dressage arena, in any endurance ride and even out there eventing. You know from firsthand experience how trainable, quiet and willing the breed really is.

How to successfully make your Standardbred a competitive mount?

I’ve picked a few main areas on how to make your standardbred into a competitive mount, how to reflect your hard work and make them be noticed in a positive way to the wider equestrian community. Turn heads and make everyone take notice on how great the Standardbred can be. These areas are what I feel are very important, not just for Standardbred horses but for any breed of horse.

It all starts from the beginning

Most of the Standardbred’s that we acquire have not been started under saddle or they have only had a few rides. Don’t be despondent, the Standardbred is already broken into harness. They have been mouthed, long reined, driven, floated, cross tied, worked with other horses. All the basic work has already been put into them. It is at this point of their changing careers, the saddle is introduced, the leg aids are introduced, the weight is shifted from being pulled to being carried on their backs.

It is at this stage I encourage (from personal experience):

  • Patience
  • Hard work
  • Patience
  • Hard work
  • Patience
  • Enjoyment

Balance is the main area I would set my focus. I too often see horses out that aren’t balanced, running forward and on the fore. I just love reading anything from Kyra Kyrklund, if you are after a good read about balance I strongly recommend visiting Dressage Today’s website to read all about her ‘smaller steps for greater balance’.

Don’t rush to take your horse out under saddle, it’s no longer a race! Don’t take them out until they are ready. If you are going to be showing, don’t take them out until they have a nice balanced walk, trot and canter (3 beat), smooth transitions in and out of canter. Same if you are going out to compete in dressage, know your test, if it is preparatory ensure you have a nice balanced walk and trot with smooth transitions.

Training is the Number 1 area no matter what level rider you are or what level your horse is at, everyone needs a good coach. A genuine set of eyes on the ground to assist with your journey. I hear too frequently how riders are put off asking for coaches for lessons because they have a Standardbred and are worried they may be rejected for a lesson for it. I feel extremely blessed to have (who I feel) are the best coaches I have access to for lessons, the amount of hours in the saddle during these lessons are invaluable. Not once throughout my career have I had any rejection or negativity from coaches, if you are willing to learn and progress your riding there won’t be anyone stopping you.

A few friendly tips to help change the 95 % perspective:
  • A picture says 1,00 words, so train and work hard at home before you have your first outing
  • Get a good coach, EA has a list of qualified coaches (dressage and showing) in your area.
  • You are never too good to learn
  • Negativity makes you ugly, ignore any hate. We all have our bad days just keep working towards your goals.
  • Enjoy your small successes as much as the large ones
  • Never think that because you ride a Standardbred you are disadvantaged
  • Professionalism goes a long way

Standardbred Showcase: Indiana Go and Dimittee Walker

I might be saying this often of late. But I have LOVED reading all the stories! None of them are the same and the passion for their horse is undeniable,

I would love to share the wonderful story of Indiana Go & Dimittee Walker for the second installment of Standardbred Showcase. #transformationtuesday. A new segment through Dressage Dreamers.

Indiana Go & Dimittee Walker

Indiana Go is a beautiful 6-year-old mare by Gotta Go Cullect who has had numerous trials with one race start at Gloucester Park in March 2016. But, deeming to be too slow it was soon after this that Dimittee and Indiana Go found each other back in August 2016.

However, it wasn’t long after the new partnership was formed that they stepped out to their first breed show in February 2017. They kicked off their competition career with much success! Being awarded Champion Standardbred Mare and Reserve Champion Off The Track Standardbred. This is definitely a positive sign of many future successes for the pair in their career ahead of them.

Standardbred Showcase

Both Dimittee and Indiana are both learning together with only a handful of rides under their belt and enjoying every step of the way. Dimittee is busy working hard training for dressage and showing, with her main goal over the next 12 months is to progress with their ridden career and to compete in a few hack shows and dressage events.

Standardbred Showcase

Dimittee is certainly a girl out of my own heart with having Charlotte Dujardin at the top of her list to have a lesson with. She is one of the most influential dressage riders of this time. Dimittee admits her biggest inspiration is Laura Bechtolsheimer with Mistral Hojris, another Olympic Great Britain dressage rider.

I wish Dimittee and Indiana Go all the success with their promising future ahead. I’ll be keen to check in with a follow up story when the pair have been to their first competition under saddle.

Standardbred Showcase

Here are a few beautiful photos of Indiana Go and Dimittee Walker.

 

If you would like to have your standardbred featured #transformationtuesday please click here for the information and email info@dressagedreamers.com.au 

 

Standardbred Showcase

Standardbred Showcase: Dribbles and Deb Thomson

I absolutely love hearing about other Standardbred’s out and about doing well for their owners. The more I post the more I hear, the more I hear the more  I want to share all these stories!

The Standardbred Showcase #transformationtuesday is a new part of Dressage Dreamers, showcasing a Standardbred a week who has made the transformation from being a harness horse into a riding horse.

I would love to share our first Standardbred Showcase

 

 Dribbles & Deb Thomson

Dribbles is his competition name too! I absolutely loved reading Deb’s email and seeing all her amazing pictures with her boy Dribbles!

Standardbred Showcase

Deb is based in Kyabram Victoria and is proud of her 9-year-old gelding named Dribbles, who is by Blissful Hall and stands at 15.1hh. Dribbles was bred by her Father in-law and was listed in the yearling sales but was passed in as he was on the small side!

Standardbred Showcase

It wasn’t until the unraced, unnamed 6-year-old Dribbles developed a suspensory injury he was retired to Deb, who started on their amazing journey together after her second child was born. While she admits he was super quiet, he did have a few quirks, noise sensitive, shying and scooting off with or without her! They soon joined the Northern Standardbred Riding Group and started getting a few competitions and shows under their belt. While Dribbles was showing a keenness for jumping, getting regular lessons from her old instructor David Quick was the help they needed to get back on track.

In just the three years they have had together and after an 8-year break for Deb away from the saddle, their list of amazing achievements:

  • Established a 3-beat canter
  • Top Ten in the Alabar HERO Series TWO YEARS running
  • Won numerous Champions and Supreme Champions in BOTH Led and Ridden
  • Learnt to lengthen and shorten the stride at the trot and canter.
  • Starting lateral work
  • Learnt to go over water jumps
  • Best performed Standardbred at the TTT CT 2018

Standardbred Showcase

In this three-year period the lowest placing they have had was in the L4 in the last 18 months is 7th which was in the TTT CT this year.

Standardbred Showcase
Photo Credit: Belinda Richardson

But, Dribbles hasn’t made the complete switch to a competition horse just yet. He lives on a racing property and gets ridden on the track. He still goes on the jogger and in the cart! Deb admits how great it is to have an ‘old stager’ to work with the younger horses and even babysitting them. He truly is a very handy horse to have around the property and is also known as the ‘useful show horse’ on the farm!

Standardbred Showcase

Dribbles is a fantastic example on how versatile the breed really is. What a talented jumper he is!

 

If you would like to have your standardbred featured #transformationtuesday please click here for the information and email info@dressagedreamers.com.au 

 

Standardbred Showcase

Standardbred Showcase

Standardbred Showcase

Every time I share a photo, post or video on Facebook I hear more and more people out there with their own Standardbreds.  I’m always completely blown away with amazement on how many horses out there doing well under saddle. I know we often fly under the radar collectively as a breed, so I would love to showcase a story of all the special Standardbreds out there.

Starting from Tuesday 17th April, I would love to share a story a week. Showcasing a Standardbred that has made the transformation into a ridden horse. I’m not just looking at showcasing horses who have won countless titles! This is open to all Standardbred’s that have turned into a ridden horse.

A few details I will need to showcase:

  • Your name and location (which state)
  • Horse Name (including race and competition name)
  • Horses Background (if raced or trialed, when did he/she come into your life etc)
  • What level your horse is currently at (how long under saddle, what discipline you are training in etc)
  • Your achievements to date (I’m looking at mainly training achievements but also let me know what competition achievements you have!)
  • Your goals for the next 12 months (training and competition etc)
  • Photos, lots of photos!
  • Your biggest inspirations
  • Who you would LOVE to have a lesson with OR who you would LOVE to have dinner with to pick their brains!
  • Anyone special mentions
  • Did I mention photos?

I will write up a story for each horse that their story has been submitted, please ensure you haven’t sent enough information for a good size write up!

#transformationtuesday

 

I’m keen to hear all the amazing stories, if you could please email all details (and photos!) to info@dressagedreamers.com.au

Arnie and I can’t wait to read everyone’s stories!

Standardbred SHowcase

My Trip Across The Ditch

My trip across the ditch

 

Earlier this year the family purchased 3 lovely fillies from the Yearling Sales in Christchurch, all 3 lovely fillies and 3 very different fillies! Making our latest team 5 Kiwis in total, sounds like we have an addiction! I was fortunate enough to hop back on the plane across the ditch and see how they were going after the breaking in prep. With New Zealand winters not favouring the horse training, a little too cold and wet. It was nice to see the fillies back in work after their winter holiday, still a little scruffy with their winter coats.

trip across the ditch

Friday

I arrived in Christchurch on a beautiful Friday afternoon, sun shining, spectacular clean crisp New Zealand air. We are so fortunate to live in this part of the world, especially when Middle Earth is only a 3-hour flight away.

We were in for an absolute treat on the Friday night with Addington races having a table in the members room with beautiful food and watching an action-packed race night. It was a spectacular experience, especially witnessing the running of Heat 3 for the Sires Stakes series. It was amazing to see Chase Auckland get the win in the heat, who went on to win the final. You can see Chase Auckland’s Heat win here on Harness Racing New Zealand website.

We retreated for an early night after the ninth race knowing we had a jam-packed Saturday!

trip across the ditch addington

Two reasons for the trip across the ditch, first one was to see our fillies and how they are developing after their breaking in prep. But also, to have a peep at Equidays NZ and to sit in on an incredible masterclass with Kyra Kyrklund. You can read all about the recap here with Kyra in my earlier blog post here.

Saturday

With Christchurch weather still on our side on the Saturday morning, it was time to drive some fillies! We watched Spider (Betterthencheddar) a nice little compact filly with a striking part white tail- workout first. At this point with her training she can be a little head strong and is a little opinionated!

trip across the ditch spider
Spider

Next, it was Libby (Sportswriter) and Misty (Shadow Play) turn to work out, I managed to steal the drive on Misty. I became rather attached to this big black girl this trip. I had an amazing experience driving Misty first up on Saturday, pushing her through a few gears with Libby. Who might I add was exceptional to watch, Libby has an amazing turn of foot. She really does look impressive when she finds that next gear!

trip across the ditch misty
Misty

I defiantly chose the right horse for me, managed to get the phone out for a quick snap on the way back in!

 

Trip across the ditch Misty Shadow

 

 

We also had a treat to see a filly who was only born several hours earlier! This stunning little girl is half sister to Spider.

 

To top off a wonderful horse day in Christchurch we visited Equidays, a pre- visit to Kyra’s Masterclass on the Sunday and to do a little shopping. I purchased a snazzy new Spooks vest and bought a matching pink one for my mother who was unable to join us on the trip. We finished off an amazing day with an absolute feast at the local Tai Tapu pub! If anyone is travelling to that area, I highly recommend the pork belly. 😊

Kyra Masterclass

 

Sunday

As it was only a short trip across the ditch, when Sunday rolled around, yet another beautiful clean crisp day. I knew it was going to be a jam-packed day. First up we attended Kyra Kyrklund’s Masterclass at Equidays, full details can be viewed here on the previous blog.

I was excited to take the reins on Misty again on day 2, she is such a straight forward filly to drive. Leading the way out on the track with Libby on my tail we pushed the fillies through the gears. We were extremely impressed how the fillies worked today. I was very chuffed with Misty, we both performed better together today over our first drive together on Saturday .

 

trip across the ditch
Misty and Libby

I just can’t believe how wonderful Christchurch’s weather can be, we were incredibly fortunate to experience sunshine over the weekend. Some of our previous visits all we have had is rain, wind and more rain!

Can’t wait for the next trip next month to take the reins with the fillies again! 🙂

Most common myths surrounding the Standardbred: Part 1

common myths surrounding the standardbred

I have long wanted to write about the most common myths about Standardbreds. Having grown up my whole life around them, enjoyed seeing their whole life. From breeding, breaking in, race prep, racing, retiring and starting under saddle.

Which I consider myself fortunate to be a part of many aspects of the breed during their life. I have an understanding about the breed, the mechanics of the breeding and have an understanding and respect for training after racing. Which is the main reason why I have held off for so long on having my opinion about what I believe are the myths about the breed.

Common myths surrounding the standardbred
All Smoked Up and half brother All The Rhythm

I’ll be honest, it used to grind my gears reading the absolute hogwash on social media about the breed. It is unfortunate to witness this hype as many people out there that know little about the breed are quick to pass judgement.

I have learnt to just keep scrolling past, when it comes to any discipline with horses you always are going to find people who are completely left field to yourself. You must learn to respect their way of thinking and way of training, and just put your block eyes on, keep hustling and focusing on your training system and your own horses.  For me this has taken a lot of time and self-discipline to be able to achieve.

So, I thought to myself, why not just put these myths on the table for discussion. I wanted to break down what I believe are the top three myths surrounding the Standardbred over three separate posts. Covering each myth in a bit of detail. I have previously posted a quick overview on the origins of the Standardbred, which I always find fascinating!

-Most common myths surrounding the Standardbred-

-Standardbred’s are trained to pace and trained not to canter-

I hear this one way to often.

To begin, Standardbred’s are a 5-gaited breed. Walk, trot, pace, canter and gallop, naturally they can canter without difficultly. The standardbred is a special breed of horse, thanks to scientists at Sweden’s Uppsala University who discovered a gene called DMRT3. Explaining how Standardbred’s have this DMRT3 gene which allows them to have the ability to pace. New York Times has an interesting article about the discovery of the DMRT3 gene.

Over the last few years learning about self-discipline also my own personal development with my training system, my reaction has changed. I used to dismiss such claims that ‘Standardbred’s would never make a riding horse as they do not have the ability to canter’.

But as I have learnt we are all different, we all have our own views nowadays, I just nod and smile and keep on scrolling on social media. If life has taught me anything thus far, all riders train differently and all horses learn differently. However, you cannot go past the fact that scientifically the horse is a 5-gaited breed.

I hear this comment from two different groups.

One, people who are not involved with the breed and have formed a misconception of the Standardbred.

Two, people who are involved within the breed but only from an “after racing” situation.

What we should remember (or learn for any new Standardbred fans) is when the Standardbred is in race training they’re not hoppled seven days a week forced to pace around and around the track forever and a day. Depending on the trainer and where the horse is up to with its training, they can be “fast worked” 2-3 times a week.

This is mixed up during the week with various training such as incorporating jogging up, swimming, galloping and a day off etc. With the various exercises the Standardbred becomes a fit athlete, capable of trotting, pacing, cantering and galloping.

I believe that many Standardbred riders out there are all individually trying hard to promote the breed with life after racing.  That’s why it is important that we support each other with our journeys, because it is damn hard to get the rest of the equestrian community to sit up and take notice. Especially to take you seriously in open competition.

common myths standardbred

Looking forward to sharing the next two parts to common myths surrounding the Standardbred.

Happy Training 😊

Standardbred Training Survey Results

A while ago a few might recall I had a survey on training with your Standardbred. I have had the time to sit down and really go through the results, thank you to everyone who took part in the survey! It is amazing to put some of these stats together about our training with these beautiful animals.

I would like to share the overall results and break down the results with my detailed thoughts over the next few blog posts. Which I’m TOTALLY looking forward to writing!

Here are the following questions asked that were happily answered by fellow Standardbred riders, thank you again it wasn’t easy for me to put feelers out there and to get an amazing response like this was fantastic!

What is your main concern with your training at this point in time?

Canter transitions – 35%

Getting a balanced trot- 35%

Having trouble with pacing – 25%

Maintaining the canter– 5 %

In addition to the above concerns more specifically people mentioned.

Improving the quality of canter

Struggles with right canter lead

Starting under saddle and transition from racing in harness to pleasure harness

Proper collection, canter transitions are fine

Refusing new jumps

Cantering under saddle

Getting a nice steady trot.

 

How long has your standardbred been under saddle?

Not yet started under saddle – 5%

Under 6 months- 20%

6-12 months– 15%

12-18 months– 10%

18-24 months– 15%

24 months and over – 35%

 

How did you come across your Standardbred?

Through an adoption program (eg SPPHA)-  25%

Purchased from a non-racing home– 45%

Family or friends involved in the industry– 25%

Sourced straight from the track- 5%

 

What State do you live in?

NSW– 30%

VIC- 25%

QLD– 15%

TAS– 10%

SA– 10%

WA– 5%

Other-5%

This next question I REALLY enjoyed reading the answers! 🙂

What is your overall goal with your Standardbred, what is it that you want to succeed at?

I had several people comment with Dressage (riders out of my own heart! High five!).

But with a mix result from endurance riding, adult riding club, a few shows, eventing, low level eventing, high level show jumping, ridden show horse, ambassador for the breed (love this one! ), breed gaited horses and to promote Standardbreds for the gaited horses under saddle, pleasure riding and cantering, and a bit of EVERYTHING. It’s great to read the versatility of disciplines that riders want to succeed at I honestly find it inspiring going through everyone’s comments. It keeps me motivated to keep doing what I’m doing with my riding, training and promoting the breed to the best of my ability.

A few other comments from people in the survey.  Exercises to help with balance and suppleness. How you started, flash back Fridays (Love this one 🙂 ), Anything to help with calming my Standardbred so i can take her to shows, tips on re-training Standardbreds, Re-training Standardbreds and reducing the pacing. How to train them under saddle.

Happy Riding !

🙂

Where did the Standardbred originate from!?

If you have a Standardbred like myself, you’re probably wondering where the breed originated from. I’m sure we have all had comments on our beauties having a striking resemblance to a Thoroughbred or even an Arab. If we are lucky even a Warmblood 😉

I thought to do a little research and a quick summary on the Standardbred history, even though I’ve lived around Standardbred’s most of my life I always find it amazing when I learn something new or even just refreshing my mind.

So,  let’s go back to a horse called Messenger (1780) an English Thoroughbred imported into the United States back in 1788. Who once on arrival into the United States was bred to mares of every type, description and variety. Messenger is the grand sire of a horse called Hambletonian (1849), who’s blood flows through our present-day Standardbred’s. Another standout was a grey mare Lady Suffolk who became the first trotter to run a mile in 2:29 1/2  this was in 1845. Lady Suffolk had previously trotted 2:26 mile under saddle, this wasn’t uncommon to see both harness and saddle races.

While the Standardbred has influential breeding from the Thoroughbreds, there is also quiet the influence from the Morgans. With producing horses, such as Ethan Allen, Justin Morgan and Daniel Lambert. Who produced many fine trotters back in time, however the Morgans had a few faults of their own. They were well known for their small size with most only topping at 14 hands high, also, being trappy-gaited, trotting with virtually a straight up and down action.

Another big influence early on developing the Standardbred was the Barb, influential family of the mid-19th century was the Clays who descended from a Barb stallion what was imported from Tripoli in 1820. He was called Grand Bashaw, from a mare of thoroughbred breeding including one cross to Messenger.

But why are the called a Standardbred?!

Quite simply really, as the breed began to mature and eventually reach a point where it became obvious that something new and exciting was bursting into the equine world. A dedicated farmer John H. Wallace created the American Trotting Register which was first published in 1871. There had to be a standard within this register for all the horses, which, if the horse could meet the standard of speed, trotting a mile in 2:30.

The Standardbred was born. 

The Standardbred breed characteristics reflects similar to the Thoroughbred. Standardbreds don’t stand as tall, on average around 15.2 however with a slightly longer body then the Thoroughbred. The head is refined set on a medium sized neck, the hind quarters  are muscular but sleek. With clean legs, set back well.

As you may have noticed there are two types of Standardbreds, we have trotters and pacers. Pacers are most commonly bred through out Australia.  Paces move their legs on one side of their body in tandem, left front and rear, and right front and rear.